Products

Critical Airflow Control Solutions in North and South Carolina

At Hahn Mason, we have been providing critical controls solutions to the Carolinas market for more than 50 years, partnering with Engineers, Contractors, and Owners to deliver successful projects. A great benefit in dealing with Hahn Mason, is the ability we have to offer our customers the unique feature of not only representing the industry’s leading manufacturers, but also offering a comprehensive solution to meet the unique requirements of your critical airflow controls project. Our systems ensure the environmental integrity of critical and healthcare facilities based on proven products developed by Antec Controls.

 

What Types of Applications Require Critical Airflow Controls?

At Hahn Mason, we are experts in the design and application of critical airflow controls to help determine which of our products are best suited for your design. Below is a list of helpful resources to help guide you on best practices when designing or implementing a critical airflow control system. Typical critical spaces we support include:

Laboratory


Design Considerations

The following are considerations when designing a laboratory. The items listed below help scope out project requirements and provide guidance on designing based on the specific needs.

What is the intended daily use of this laboratory?

The first step in laboratory design is to understand how the end-user plans to use the space. Laboratory design is affected by the regular activities performed in the space, the chemicals or processes used, and the level of containment that is required.

What is the minimum ventilation rate?

Unlike healthcare applications, there is not one single reference that prescribes the minimum ventilation rate that is required in a laboratory. It falls to the facility owner and engineer to determine the appropriate ventilation rate.

What types of fume hood are used?

Different fume hood models and types will require different air volumes and will be associated with different pressure losses in the system. In addition, the selected hood type will affect the type of controls and accessories that are required.

What chemicals will be used in these hoods?

The chemicals and the concentration of the chemicals used inside the fume hoods will dictate the type of coating needed. There are generally four categories of valve coating:

  • Uncoated
  • Phenolic and/or Stainless Steel Parts
  • Phenolic with No Exposed Metal
  • PVDF and/or Teflon

What air valve technology will be used?

Venturi valves are the preferred air valve technology for use in a laboratory environment. The mechanical pressure independence of a venturi valve allows for instantaneous response to changes in duct static pressure which occur frequently and rapidly as fume hoods are opened and closed. High-accuracy terminals are also an acceptable solution for laboratories, but should be applied with discretion as they do not respond as quickly to changes in duct static pressure.

What room control strategies will be used?

This is in reference to a room airflow control strategy. Flow offset control is employed by maintaining a constant volumetric offset between supply and exhaust flow in the space. Pressure control, where the room is controlled to a constant pressure, is also an acceptable control strategy, but should be employed with caution as it is less stable and introduces the risk of overshoot or undershoot.


Healthcare Operating Rooms


Design Considerations

The following are considerations when designing a healthcare operating room. The items listed below help scope out project requirements and provide guidance on designing based on the specific needs.

What is the intended daily use of this operating room (OR)?

The first step in operating room design is to understand how the end user plans to use the space. Several different types of operating rooms exist, each with their own needs for equipment and environmental controls.

What air valve technology should be used?

High accuracy terminals paired with standard speed actuation are the preferred air valve technology in operating rooms as they provide a stable and cost-effective solution. High-accuracy terminals also have a much lower risk of lint or other airborne particulates interfering with valve control or accuracy compared to standard accuracy terminals. High-accuracy terminals should be paired with standard speed actuation in operating rooms to assure that modulation for changes in duct static pressure does not introduce system instability. Venturi valves and standard accuracy terminals can also be considered depending on the application.

What room control strategy will be used?

Flow offset control is employed by maintaining a constant volumetric offset between supply and exhaust flow in the space. Pressure control, where the room is controlled to a constant
pressure, is also an acceptable control strategy. However, pressure control but should be employed with caution as it can be less stable when responding to changes in system static
pressure and introduces the risk of overshoot or undershoot. In addition, door switches should always be installed when implementing pressure control to ensure the room is not over or under pressurized in response to the door being opened.

Will dynamic temperature control be required?

According to ASHRAE 170 Table 7.1, a standard operating room should operate between 68°F and 75°F. However according to the ASHRAE Applications Handbook certain specialized cardiac
surgeries should be performed at a room temperature as low as 62°F. The handbook goes further to state that these ranges are not intended to be dynamic control ranges. This means that where possible, the temperature setpoint in an OR should be set at commissioning time and then held constant.

What supply diffusers and return air grilles will be used in the OR?

As ceiling space in an operating room is limited, the selection of appropriate methods of providing the supply and exhaust airflow becomes critical.


Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical


Design Considerations

The following are considerations when designing a compounding pharmacy. The items listed below help scope out project requirements and provide guidance on designing based on the specific needs.

What is the intended use of this pharmacy?

Compounding pharmacies are used to mix compounds that are not commercially available in the required doses. These compounds are known as compounding sterile preparations (CSPs) and fall into four categories:

  • Hazardous Drugs – reference USP 800
  • Non-Hazardous Drugs
  • Sterile Drugs – reference USP 797
  • Non-Sterile Drugs – reference USP 795

Pharmacies have different space requirements for each drug type. Reference the appropriate standard listed above for the type of drug being mixed in the space.

What type of Primary Engineering Controls (C-PEC) are used?

Biological Safety Cabinets (BSC) are the most common form of C-PEC in a pharmacy. BSCs are split three classes:

  • Class I – Provide protection for personnel only. They provide no protection for the agent being mixed nor the environment
  • Class II – Provide protection for the agent being mixed, personnel and the environment.
  • Class III – Create a physical barrier between the worker and the agent being mixed. These offer the highest form of containment and protect the agent being mixed, personnel and the environment

What air valve technology will be used?

The preferred air valve technology in compounding pharmacies is dependent on the application.

What room control strategy will be used?

Flow offset control is the preferred room control strategy in compounding pharmacies as it is the most stable solution. Compounding pharmacies are generally small spaces with high air
change rates which creates an environment that is difficult to steadily pressurize. Flow offset control is employed by maintaining a constant volumetric offset between supply and exhaust
flow in the space.

Pressure control, where the room is controlled to a constant pressure, is also an acceptable control strategy. This method should be employed with caution as it can be less stable and introduces the risk of overshoot or undershoot.

What is the minimum ventilation rate?

USP 800 requires that pharmacies mixing sterile preparations maintain a minimum of 30 air changes per hour (ACH) in the mixing space and the connected ante space. Non-sterile spaces
are required to maintain a minimum of 12 ACH.


Why Choose Hahn Mason for Your Critical Air Controls?

Through a combination of both innovative and sustainable critical airflow controls Hahn Mason offers the latest technology to meet specifications of your project. We deliver these solutions through a highly trained and experienced team of professionals dedicated to serving the needs of today’s facility designers and building owners.

Our team strives to provide our clients with the highest level of service, support and technical competence during the design stage, contracting, installation and post project support. As a leader in critical controls solutions, we take pride in focusing on our customer’s needs. In addition to high quality products, you can count on exceptional customer service from the Antec Controls team. We are here to help you through every step of the project.

Safety

Our products are designed to create safe work spaces. Leveraging pressurization control sequences ensures that all individuals within these spaces remain safe at all times

Energy Savings

Building maintenance costs are growing as energy costs increase. Our products help reduce usage and save costs for Owners:

  • Setback or Unoccupied modes allow end users to schedule reduced airflows which helps to reduce energy usage.
  • With high turndown rates, laboratory and healthcare spaces can have their supply and exhaust air volumes drastically reduced while still maintaining accurate control

Owner Autonomy and Transparency

  • Training is available to facility staff on how to properly install, use and troubleshoot our products, allowing for quick installation and local support.
  • Our products are designed with BACnet and BTL certified to integrate with BAS systems without the need of an additional gateway network device.
  • Customers can easily access up to date, accurate product and application information on the Antec Controls website.

Contact Hahn-Mason for Your Next Critical Air Controls Application

Are you located in the Carolinas and in need of critical airflow control solutions for your facility? Contact Hahn-Mason Air Systems today at (704)-523-5000. Hahn-Mason has 10 offices conveniently located in Raleigh, Charlotte, Asheville, Hickory, Eastern NC, Greensboro, Greenville, Charleston, Columbia, and Virginia.